Natelie King - Curator


  • Episodes: Australian Photography Now

    Susan Sontag’s prophetic account of the insatiability of photography anticipates the ubiquitous quality of photography in the 21st century.

  • Polixeni Papapetrou in Conversation With Natalie King

    Polixeni Papapetrou flexes the camera’s hold on her subjects: Natalie King: Initially you trained as a lawyer and then became a practicing children…

  • Falling Back to Earth: Cai Guo-Qiang

    Despite two failed pyrotechnic ‘explosion projects’ for the 1996 and 1999 Asia Pacific Triennials of Contemporary Art (APT), Cai Guo-Qiang…

  • Whisper in My Mask

    June issue of Broadsheet: Presents a major critical analysis of the Biennale of Sydney, international biennales, artist and activist protest and the corporate…

  • Rewind: How not to remember?

    Andrew Renton’s poetic refrain, ‘How not to remember?’ in his catalogue essay accompanying Kathy Temin’s capacious three-part installation at ACCA in 1995 urged us to remember.

  • LEAP 27 Biennale of Sydney

    Aboriginal artist Michael Cook depicts the urbane within the urban in his new photographic series “Majority Rule” (2014). For the 19th Biennale of Sydney, he casts the same indigenous protagonist in Australian civic…

  • Hou Hanru

    For every great artist there is something familiar about the contour of each artwork even when the content is radically different.

  • A Human Texture: the Video Portraits of Candice Breitz

    Candice Breitz draws us into the devotional world of fandom and pop music by recruiting twenty-five ardent John Lennon fans to re-perform…

  • Natalie King – What makes a great photograph?

    Natalie King is a curator and writer with a special interest in photography. She is the Director of Utopia@Asialink, University of Melbourne.

  • LEAP 22 Auckland Triennial

    In New Zealand’s post-apocalyptic film, The Quiet Earth (1985), three solitary protagonists survive a cataclysmic disaster in Hamilton. Surrounded by refuse and wreckage…

  • Machines of knowledge & experimentation

    On the eve of the 5th Auckland Triennial, Natalie King interviewed internationally renowned biennial curator Hou Hanru via Skype…

  • Hou Hanru in Conversation, April 2013

    On the eve of the 5th Auckland Triennial, Natalie King interviewed internationally renowned biennial curator Hou Hanru via Skype…

  • Jitish Kallat: An Evolving Narrative in 8 Acts

    Mumbai-based artist Jitish Kallat deploys charred text and rewinding time as central leitmotifs in his first solo exhibition in an Australian museum…

  • Locality & Mobility: Australia & South Korea tandem-style

    In May 2012, a group of key thinkers in arts from Australia and South Korea gathered together at the invitation of Arts Victoria and the Department of Business…

  • Gigi Scaria: Prisms of perception

    Gigi Scaria was born in Kerala, India, in 1973. He is one of a new generation of Indian artists who has established a significant international exhibition profile with exhibitions…

  • Jitish Kallat: Circa

    Jitish Kallat: Circa is Kallat’s first solo exhibition in an Australian museum. Following the reflective nature of his recent projects, this exhibition is conceived as an evolving…

  • Searching for Lemuria: India 2012 and Beyond

    Asialink, based at the University of Melbourne is Australia’s leading centre for the promotion of public understanding of Asia and Australia’s…

  • The Lemuria forum at the Melbourne Festival

    The utopian idea of Lemuria is an imaginary, submerged landscape hugging the shoreline between Australia and India. This hypothetical…

  • Shadowlife

    Shadowlife is a significant exhibition that will assist in developing a deeper understanding of contemporary Australian art and the multiplicities of…

  • Press Release 2012 – Shadow Life

    The Australian Embassy Bangkok and Bangkok Art and Culture Centre (BACC) proudly present Shadowlife, an exhibition of photography and moving image works by…

  • Kate Daw, “Civil Twilight End”

    Civil Twilight End is a permanent public art project by Melbourne-based artists Kate Daw and Stewart Russell, that brings a sense of community, reverie and natural rhythm to the Docklands precinct.

  • Utopia presents Intimate Publics

    As social, geo-social and mobile media render the intimate public and the public intimate, what is the impact on art practice and politics? Curated by Utopia—a roving visual arts project for the…

  • Bill Henson in conversation with Natalie King

    Bill Henson held his first solo exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria in 1975, at the age of 19. Since that time he has become one of Australia’s most celebrated artists.

  • People love to watch: From Mr Rumbold to Julian Assange

    Almost forty years ago, a 1974 episode of the British television comedy Are You Being Served? played out in burlesque many of the problems and possible…

  • Up Close: Carol Jerrems with Larry Clark, Nan Goldin and William Yang

    This publication looks at four of the most influential photographers of the last 40 years, and whose works are steeped in the social, sexual and cultural politics of their time.

  • Hiroshi Sugimoto, Photofile, 2010

    HIROSHI SUGIMOTO: When I was first invited to Sydney I was given a number of potential sites including Pier 2/3, MCA and Cockatoo Island…

  • Accumulation: the aesthetics of waste & recycling

    At the turn of the 20th century, the French photographer Eugène Atget depicted the figure of the chiffonniers, or ragpickers, to reveal the uneven development of capitalist modernity…

  • The material of meaning: Illuminating the art of Joseph Kosuth

    Joseph Kosuth is candid, astute and erudite. At the time of our meeting in Sydney, I was reading Pierre Cabanne’s dialogue with Marcel Duchamp and the latter’s views on the elastic definition…

  • Up Close – Heide Museum of Modern Art

    Up Close traces the significant legacy of Australian photographer Carol Jerrems (1949–1980) and situates her work alongside that of other photo-based artists…

  • Fatal Attraction

    In 2005, Joe Korp committed suicide on the day his wife, Maria, was buried. Previously, Tania Herman, who was having an affair with Korp, choked Maria in her suburban garage.